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San Antonio (210) 922-1551

 

December 2020

Wednesday, 23 December 2020 00:00

Do Your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Monday, 21 December 2020 00:00

Are You Suffering From Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis occurs when the ligament that runs along the bottom of the foot, called the plantar fascia, becomes inflamed. Plantar fasciitis causes pain in the heel, which is usually worse in the morning, after prolonged standing, or after an intense workout. It can also be associated with a heel spur, which occurs as a spike of bone that points out from the heel bone. Common risk factors for developing plantar fasciitis include playing sports that put stress on the heel bone, being flat footed, being middle-aged, obesity, pregnancy, and spending a lot of time on your feet. Common methods of relief include taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, resting the foot, and wearing proper footwear or orthotics. If you are suffering from heel pain, don't hesitate to speak with a podiatrist.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Murad M. Abdel-qader from Advanced Family Foot Care Centers. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in San Antonio, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Monday, 14 December 2020 00:00

Common Foot and Ankle Injuries in Football

Football players run a high risk for developing a variety of injuries, and some of those injuries involve the foot or ankle. One common injury is an Achilles tendon rupture. The Achilles tendon is the longest and strongest tendon in the body, and it helps players push off their feet, jump, and accelerate. Overuse or excessive force can result in a tear or rupture. Treatment generally requires surgery and about 9 months to heal, but with new technology some players have returned to play just 6 months after surgery. High ankle sprains occur often, and they are the result of a tear to the ligaments that connect the tibia and fibula. Recovery can take as long as 6 to 8 weeks. A complex career-threatening injury is known as a Lisfranc injury. This occurs when there is a sprain or break of the metatarsal bones in the mid foot. Even a minor sprain in the mid foot that doesn't require surgery can still take 6-8 weeks to heal. Lastly, when a player hyperextends their big toe, it is known as turf toe. This is caused by the ligaments under the joint of the big toe being ruptured or sprained. It is highly suggested that anyone who is suffering with a foot or ankle injury seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Ankle and foot injuries are common among athletes and in many sports. They can be caused by several problems and may be potentially serious. If you are feeling pain or think you were injured in a sporting event or when exercising, consult with Dr. Murad M. Abdel-qader from Advanced Family Foot Care Centers. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Common Injuries

The most common injuries that occur in sporting activities include:

  • Achilles Tendonitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains
  • Broken Foot
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Stress Fractures
  • Turf Toe

Symptoms

Symptoms vary depending upon the injury and in some cases, there may be no symptoms at all. However, in most cases, some form of symptom is experienced. Pain, aching, burning, bruising, tenderness, tightness or stiffness, sensation loss, difficulty moving, and swelling are the most common symptoms.

Treatment

Just as symptoms vary depending upon the injury, so do treatment options. A common treatment method is known as the RICE method. This method involves rest, applying ice, compression and elevating the afflicted foot or ankle. If the injury appears to be more serious, surgery might be required, such as arthroscopic or reconstructive surgery. Lastly, rehabilitation or therapy might be needed to gain full functionality in the afflicted area. Any discomfort experienced by an athlete must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in San Antonio, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Sports Related Foot And Ankle Injuries

Tarsal tunnel syndrome occurs when there is a compression or squeezing of the posterior tibial nerve as it travels through the tarsal tunnel. The tarsal tunnel is a narrow space that lies on the inside of the ankle and it contains arteries, veins, tendons and nerves, including the tibial nerve. There can be a variety of causes for this compression such as an abnormal structure in the area, a cyst or bone spur, an injury that causes inflammation like an ankle sprain, and diseases like arthritis and diabetes. Those who have flat feet are also at a higher risk for tarsal tunnel syndrome because the heel tilts and can strain or stress to the nerve. Symptoms individuals experience consist of pain or numbness to the affected area, or a burning or tingling sensation which is often described similar to “pins and needles." Common treatment options for tarsal tunnel syndrome include orthotics, braces, rest, physical therapy, and in severe cases, surgery. If you are suffering from any symptom of tarsal tunnel syndrome it is important to visit a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Dr. Murad M. Abdel-qader of Advanced Family Foot Care Centers. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in San Antonio, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Treating Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
Tuesday, 01 December 2020 00:00

Diagnostic Tests for Peripheral Artery Disease

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition that causes poor circulation in the lower limbs due to blockages in the blood vessels that supply blood to this area. There are a variety of diagnostic tests that a doctor may use to diagnose you with PAD. Most of these tests are quick, painless, and noninvasive. The ankle-brachial index is a screening for PAD in which the doctor takes your blood pressure at your arm and at your ankle and then compares the two numbers to determine how well blood is flowing in your lower limbs. The Doppler ultrasound is an imaging test that visualizes the blood flow in the major arteries and veins and can determine where there may be a blockage. A treadmill test, in which you are asked to walk on a treadmill, can show the severity of your PAD symptoms and the level of activity that brings them on. To be tested for PAD, or to learn more about this condition, talk to a podiatrist today.

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with Dr. Murad M. Abdel-qader from Advanced Family Foot Care Centers. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in San Antonio, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Vascular Testing in Podiatry
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